Confraternity of the Faithless: Wilde's Christianity
[excerpt]

 

 

Simon Critchley

 

To resume again...

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- A MILLER

Hegel, Kant, Lacan
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LAIN BADIOU

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M
ASSIMO RECALCATI

Confraternity of the Faithless:
Wilde's Christianity
S
IMON CRITCHLEY

Fairly Orthodox Anarchist-Libertarian
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ICHARD KOSTELANETZ

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EAN-LUC NANCY

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LAVOJ ZIZEK

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ATHY LEBOWITZ
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Helms image

 

For such an act of self-realization, Wilde insists, neither religion nor morality nor reason can help. This is because each of these faculties requires the invocation of some sort of external agency. Morality, for Wilde, is about the sanction of externally imposed law and must therefore be rejected. Wilde says that he is, "One of those who are made for exceptions, not for laws". Interestingly, it is in exactly these terms that he describes the morality of Christ later in De profundis. Christ's morality is sheer sympathy with the other and his conception of justice is poetic, "For him there were no laws: there were exceptions merely".

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Art: Adam Helms
Untitled Portrait (Zarqa) - double sided silkscreen on vellum, 2007
courtesy Marianne Boesky Gallery.

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